Tagcausal inference

Northwestern causal inference workshop

There are some heavy hitters presenting: 2022 Northwestern Main and Advanced Causal Inference Workshops [please recirculate to others who might be interested] After a COVID break during 2020 and 2021, we are excited to be holding our 11th annual workshop on Research Design for Causal Inference at Northwestern Law School in Chicago, IL.  We invite you to attend.  Our apologies for the...

Compelling evidence that lockdowns did not work

This post does a nice job summarizing a recent meta-analysis of lockdown studies. If you’re not familiar with meta-analyses, they are a study of studies: researchers gather a group of studies an area, like lockdowns, and statistically analyze the collective results. This helps us understand what the field really knows, rather than relying on that one study that was trumpeted by the media...

Causal inference workshops at Duke

Northwestern University and Duke University are holding our “main” week-long workshop on Research Design for Causal Inference – our 10th annual workshop — at Duke University in Raleigh-Durham.  We invite you to attend.  Our apologies for the length of this message. Main Workshop:  Monday – Friday, August 12-16, 2019 We will also be holding an “Advanced” Workshop the following week: Advanced...

Causal inference workshops at Northwestern

Northwestern University and Duke University are holding our “main” week-long workshop on Research Design for Causal Inference – our ninth annual workshop — at Northwestern Law School in downtown Chicago.  We invite you to attend.  Our apologies for the length of this message.   Main Workshop:  Monday – Friday, June 18-22, 2018   We will also be holding an “Advanced” Workshop the following...

Making students volunteer makes them volunteer less

Does ‘compulsory volunteering’ affect subsequent behavior? Evidence from a natural experiment in Canada This paper estimates the impact of ‘compulsory volunteerism’ for adolescents on subsequent volunteer behavior exploiting the introduction of a mandatory community service program for high school (HS) students in Ontario, Canada. We use difference-in-differences approach with a large...

Difference-in-difference analysis of Melissa Click

And then the other shoe dropped: Last week, UM announced that new pledges and donations in December — a key month for university fundraising — fell $6 million, a decrease of roughly 31 percent. Only the Columbia branch, where the protests took place, suffered these losses. No other UM branch experienced declines.

IES training on RCTs

I attended this several years ago, and it was one of the best training experiences I’ve had:

You will learn about much more than just RCTs.

Compelling evidence that broken windows theory of crime is true

What is “broken windows“? The broken windows theory is a criminological theory of the norm-setting and signaling effect of urban disorder and vandalism on additional crime and anti-social behavior. The theory states that maintaining and monitoring urban environments to prevent small crimes such as vandalism, public drinking and toll-jumping helps to create an atmosphere of order and...

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Professor and quant guy. Libertarian turned populist Republican. Trying to learn Japanese and play Spanish Baroque music on the ukulele.

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